Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Busy Moms Guide to Parenting Young Children by Paul C. Reisser, M. D.

Busy Mom's Guide To Parenting Young Children
With almost everything you need to know to care for your family available on the Internet or at the library these days, how do you sort through the wealth of information available? How do you narrow down your web search? And how many pages are in that reference guide? It can be overwhelming to look for specific information. Relax--we have the cure for the common search. The information you need is at your fingertips in the practical and easy-to-use "Busy Mom's Guide" series. Using a question-and-answer format, "Busy Mom's Guide to Parenting Young Children" takes you from birth through the "terrible twos" and into the tween years with tips on discipline, sleep patterns, potty training, sports involvement, and more. Tired already? Get energized and equipped for the journey with the quick reference material found inside, and look forward to the joy of growing with your child.Some content previously published in the Complete Guide's "Baby & Childcare."

I grew up with listening to James Dobson and Focus on the Family (Adventures in Odyssey:) and endorse both. So when I saw this book was written by Reisser; who works with Focus on the Family, I had to grab at the opportunity. Especially having a young child of my own:) This book is definitely more of a question and answer type book It is first set up in sections (the first three months, three to six months, six to twelve, etc.Then it goes to two, three and four year olds). The book starts off with Preparing yourself and your family which was great for starters. Because this chapters talks about before the child comes and what you may not of thought of to prepare. Like the type of birth you would like to have (Cesarian, home birth, hospital, no meds, etc). As for the other chapters dealing with infancy to four years of age, the information is so helpful. From potty training, to sleeping schedules, eating, how to deal with a picky eater, what to expect at medical check ups, calorie in take (younger children should have a few more then we might think since they burn them off so fast with playing, running, and their seemingly endless energy that I bet we all wish we could have!), separation and bedtime anxieties (have a routine set up so your child won't feel like it came out of nowhere but was ready for it so they can deal with it better.)
I read this book cover to cover and recommend it to all who are parents, expectant parents, and all who are involved with the child(s) on a day to day / daily basis.


I received this book for review from the Tyndale Blog Network
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