Monday, January 23, 2017

**Review** The Skeleton Code by Alla Campanella and Ken Massey

The Skeleton Code: A Satirical Guide to Secret Keeping

Early in life, we learn to exaggerate our positive personal qualities and hide or deny our failures and weaknesses. The Skeleton Code is a satirical and humorous look at the many ways we protect our public personas by closeting our personal secrets, an ultimately self-deluding way of life. As a parody of the self-help success genre, the book presents facetious strategies about how to cover up our silly and scandalous secrets before turning to The Skeleton Cure."

Review:
 I enjoy satire so I was looking forward to reading this. It did have good satirical points about secret keeping and keeping others secrets...how we have secrets we don't ever share or even articulate to ourselves. How we seem to keep the thought process of keeping all secrets locked up on the back burner for the fear that they may burst out and show the truth. Both authors did a wonderful job keeping the majority of the book at a satire level. Which can be very difficult when you cant hear inflection of tone or read body language or facial expressions. They did feel the need (probably a smart choice!) to premise the book with a disclaimer that they do not support or condone immoral, illegal, or unethical behaviors...probably for those that may take this satire seriously... 
There is even parts in the book where they help prepare you for an incident of exposure of secrets; i.e. how to react and respond.
That said, I found it at times hard to read, more like trudge through...and at times I wondered if they were using their satire as cover for how they would really react to a situation. I think it would have helped if there was honesty sprinkled throughout the book to help keep them grounded for the readers sake. 
In the end of the book though, they do have a great point which brought this to full circle for me: that it is healthier to bring the skeletons out and deal with them than to hide them and worry. It can make a person emotionally, mentally, and physically sick about worrying about their secrets staying in the closet. You feel a lot lighter knowing you have nothing to hide (or lie) about.
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